The rise of online misogyny

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Andrew Tate, a self-proclaimed “bad boy” of British jiu-jitsu and a member of the U.K. Olympic team, has been riding a wave of online misogyny, says Northeastern expert Katherine Lo.

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Tate has come under fire in recent weeks for a series of videos and social media posts in which he brags about assaulting women, using racist and homophobic slurs, and insulting other athletes. 

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In one video, Tate can be seen punching his then-girlfriend in the face.

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After several major platforms—including TikTok and YouTube—banned him from their platforms, Tate took to Instagram to decry what he called “censorship.”

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“I think it’s important to have these conversations about what is and isn’t acceptable behavior, 

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But I also think it’s important to have open dialogue about free speech and censorship,” Lo said.

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While Lo doesn’t condone Tate’s behavior, she said that he should be allowed to express himself freely, within certain limits.

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“There are definitely things that are over the line and should not be tolerated. 

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But I think there is a place for free speech even when it is hateful or offensive, as long as it doesn’t lead to violence or other criminal behavior,” she said.

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As summer break ends and students return to their desks, some teachers have noticed a disturbing trend. 

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